Beneath the Surface

Dive Deeper With Our Dermatology Blog

No Mulligans When It Comes to Skin Cancer

Yesterday marked the start of National Golf Month. Unfortunately, in our industry, golfing makes us think of skin cancer. Studies show that recreational golfers are at a high risk of developing skin cancer since every hour, they can receive 3.5 to 5.4 times the amount of UV radiation exposure needed to cause sunburn. It’s not just the sun that makes golfing dangerous — some hazards on courses, like water in ponds and sand in sand traps, can reflect UV radiation so that it hits your skin twice.

golf, sunscreen, skin cancer

It’s also hardly surprising that golfers are more prone to skin cancer considering the amount of time they spend outside. To help protect golfers and lower skin cancer rates, follow this list of recommendations to stay safe while on the green.

Schedule an Early/Late Tee Time

Try to tee off when the sun is less intense, meaning before 10 AM or after 4 PM.

Seek the Shade

When it’s possible, seek shade on the course. Standing under trees or sitting in a golf cart with a roof are good options.

Wear Wide-brim Hats

Wear a hat to shade your scalp, face, neck, ears and shoulders. A good rule of thumb is to wear a hat with a brim at least three inches wide.

Wear Long-sleeve Shirts and Pants

Wear long-sleeve shirts and long pants to cover as much skin as possible.

Don’t Forget UV-protective Sunglasses

Protect your eyes, eyelids and the surrounding areas with sunglasses that block 99-100 percent of UV radiation.

Sunscreen Protects You on Overcast Days Too

Even if the sun isn’t shining, you still need to wear sunscreen and protect your skin. Up to 80 percent of the sun’s UV radiation can penetrate clouds.

Bring SPF 30+ Broad Spectrum Sunscreen

Apply sunscreen every two hours (or every nine holes) to skin that is not covered by clothing. Don’t forget areas like ears, back of the hands and the scalp.

We’re sure you know, but there are no mulligans when it comes to sun damage. We hope you do your part to stay safe and prevent skin cancer anytime you’re outside.

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